Monthly Archives: June 2013

Drinking Water in the Cross-Canyon Corridor – date posted Aug 8, 2013

There is a break in the transcanyon pipeline approximately five miles north of Phantom Ranch at the north end of the "Box". Repairs will start Aug 8 and, if all goes well, are expected to take approximately two days. During the shutdown of the waterline for repairs, drinking water will not be available at Roaring Springs or Cottonwood Campground. Please remember, when hiking below the rim a method to treat water must always be part of your hiking gear.

Purified drinking water is usually available year-round at Bright Angel and Indian Garden Campgrounds and at Bright Angel and South Kaibab trailheads.

Grand Canyon’s water supply comes from Roaring Springs, a natural spring located approximately 3,500 feet below the North Rim. Water is delivered via an aging pipeline that suffers multiple breaks a year. When the pipeline breaks, water stops flowing to the North and South Rims and sites along the way. Although large storage tanks provide ample water to rim locations, while the pipeline is being repaired water may or may not be available below the rim in the cross-canyon Corridor. Please remember, when hiking below the rim a method to treat water must always be part of your hiking gear.

The list below shows if water has been turned on or off for the season (if the pipeline is undergoing repairs water may be off temporarily)

  • North Kaibab Trailhead: water turned ON
  • Supai Tunnel: water turned ON
  • Roaring Springs Day Use Area: water turned ON
  • Cottonwood Campground: water turned ON
  • Bright Angel Campground:ON year-round
  • Indian Garden: ON year-round
  • Bright Angel Trail, Three-Mile Resthouse: water turned ON
  • Bright Angel Trail, Mile-and-a-Half Resthouse: water turned ON
  • Bright Angel Trailhead: ON year-round
  • South Kaibab Trailhead: ON year-round

Seasonal water stations are usually turned off for the winter sometime between Oct 10th and 30th dependent on location and associated temperatures.

Water available (year-round) on the South Rim at the Backcountry Information Center in the lobby. Water available (year-round) on the North Rim outside the Backcountry Information Center. Additional water bottle filling stations can be found on the Go “Green” and Refill Your Water Bottles web page.

Plan Ahead and Prepare: A backup method to treat water, should the pipeline break, must always be included as part of your hiking gear. Backcountry hikers should always carry extra water.

Drinking Water in the Cross-Canyon Corridor – date posted Jun 26, 2013

Purified drinking water is usually available year-round at Bright Angel and Indian Garden Campgrounds and at Bright Angel and South Kaibab trailheads.

Grand Canyon’s water supply comes from Roaring Springs, a natural spring located approximately 3,500 feet below the North Rim. Water is delivered via an aging pipeline that suffers multiple breaks a year. When the pipeline breaks, water stops flowing to the North and South Rims and sites along the way. Although large storage tanks provide ample water to rim locations, while the pipeline is being repaired water may or may not be available below the rim in the cross-canyon Corridor. Please remember, when hiking below the rim a method to treat water must always be part of your hiking gear.

The list below shows if water has been turned on or off for the season (if the pipeline is undergoing repairs water may be off temporarily)

  • North Kaibab Trailhead: water turned ON
  • Supai Tunnel: water turned ON
  • Roaring Springs Day Use Area: water turned ON
  • Cottonwood Campground: water turned ON
  • Bright Angel Campground:ON year-round
  • Indian Garden: ON year-round
  • Bright Angel Trail, Three-Mile Resthouse: water turned ON
  • Bright Angel Trail, Mile-and-a-Half Resthouse: water turned ON
  • Bright Angel Trailhead: ON year-round
  • South Kaibab Trailhead: ON year-round

Seasonal water stations are usually turned off for the winter sometime between Oct 10th and 30th dependent on location and associated temperatures.

Water available (year-round) on the South Rim at the Backcountry Information Center in the lobby. Water available (year-round) on the North Rim outside the Backcountry Information Center. Additional water bottle filling stations can be found on the Go “Green” and Refill Your Water Bottles web page.

Plan Ahead and Prepare: A backup method to treat water, should the pipeline break, must always be included as part of your hiking gear. Backcountry hikers should always carry extra water.

2012 Wiretap Report: Drug Offenses Most Frequent Surveillance Target

In calendar year 2012, a total of 3,395 orders authorizing the interception of wire, oral, or electronic communications, or wiretaps, were approved by state and federal judges. The Administrative Office of the United States Courts (AO) is required by statute to report to Congress the number of federal and state applications for orders authorizing or approving wiretaps. The 2012 Wiretap Report and previous annual reports are available online, along with responses to frequently asked questions.

For the 2012 reporting period, January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012, 97 percent of all wiretaps were authorized for “portable devices,” a category that includes cellular telephones and digital pagers. In addition, 87 percent of all 2012 applications for intercepts cited illegal drugs as the most serious offense under investigation.  As of December 31, 2012, a total of 3,743 persons had been arrested and 455 persons had been convicted as a result of interceptions reported as terminated.

The Wiretap Report does not include data on interceptions regulated by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 1978. The AO is not authorized to collect or report this data.

No report to the AO is needed when an order is issued with the consent of one of the principal parties to the communication. No report is required for the use of a pen register unless the pen register is used in conjunction with any other wiretap devices whose use must be recorded.

Forty-eight jurisdictions, including the federal government, the District of Columbia, the Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico, and 44 states, have laws authorizing courts to issue orders permitting wire, oral, or electronic surveillance. 

Visit the 2012 Wiretap Report
Wiretap Report FAQs

DOE Data Explorer retooled with new website design, more content and search functionality

DOE Data ExplorerDDE still provides the same access to publicly available DOE-sponsored data and other non-text information, with records to great collections at DOE’s national laboratories, program offices, and user facilities. The database itself has been retooled with new, underlying software, new functionalities, and more content. DDE has been expanded to include records identifying individual datasets/datastreams submitted to OSTI from DOE Data Centers and other sites. Information about OSTI’s Data ID Service is now part of the website.

Search functionality has been improved. Date range searching has been added for datasets with publication dates; as well as a relevance sort; and a Boolean search has been made available from the Advanced Search page. Browse DDE content by title, subject category, sponsor/funding organization, other related organization and type. Types are wide-ranging, encompassing: animations/simulations; figures/data plots; genome/genetics data; interactive data maps; multimedia; numeric data; specialized mix; and still images/photographs.

Future enhancements will be announced on the “What’s New” page and in the meantime remember to check out the monthly DDE Featured Collection!

Protect Yourself Against Tick-Borne Disease

The best known tick-borne diseases in the U.S. are Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain fever, but scientists at the Food and Drug Administration found an increasing number of cases of babesiosis, a serious disease caused by a parasite carried by the same ticks that carry Lyme disease. Learn about these diseases and how to avoid them.

DOE Data Explorer retooled with new website design, more content and search functionality

DDE still provides the same access to publicly available DOE-sponsored data and other non-text information, with records to great collections at DOE’s national laboratories, program offices, and user facilities. The database itself has been retooled with new, underlying software, new functionalities, and more content. DDE has been expanded to include records identifying individual datasets/datastreams submitted to OSTI from DOE Data Centers and other sites.

DOE Data Explorer retooled with new website design, more content and search functionality

DDE still provides the same access to publicly available DOE-sponsored data and other non-text information, with records to great collections at DOE’s national laboratories, program offices, and user facilities. The database itself has been retooled with new, underlying software, new functionalities, and more content. DDE has been expanded to include records identifying individual datasets/datastreams submitted to OSTI from DOE Data Centers and other sites.

Research Report Digest, Issue 10

The Research Report Digest presents findings from research funded by the National Institute of Justice. Here you will find brief descriptions of studies in a variety of criminal justice disciplines, such as criminology and forensic sciences, and evaluations of technologies that are used in the law enforcement and corrections fields. The entries include links to the full research reports.

PACER Survey Shows Rise in User Satisfaction

PACER has seen a sharp rise in overall user satisfaction since a comparable survey was conducted in 2009, with 90 percent of users saying they are satisfied or highly satisfied with the internet-based public case information system. That compares with 75 percent satisfaction with the overall user experience in the previous survey.

Conversely, only 3 percent of users consider themselves “dissatisfied,” compared with 15 percent four years ago. On a scale of 1 to 5, users also gave a higher average overall satisfaction rating: 4.26 in 2012, versus 3.97 in 2009. The findings, prepared by an independent consultant, were based on an analysis of 1,752 completed surveys, representing a response rate of 20 percent from a randomly selected pool of users.

“It’s a reflection of the conscientious work done up and down the judiciary. They’ve been responsive to the public, and to users generally,” said U.S. Circuit Court Judge Andre Davis, who is a member of the Judicial Conference’s Information Technology Committee. 

 

*Due to rounding, percentages may not add up to 100%.

Formally called Public Access to Court Electronic Records, the PACER service provides courts, litigants, and the public with access to more than 500 million documents filed in federal courts through the Case Management/Electronic Case Files (CM/ECF) system. In any given year, about a half-million accounts are used to access PACER. (To learn more about PACER, visit www.PACER.gov.)

According to an executive summary (pdf) of the newest survey, numerous upgrades have been made to PACER in recent years—changes that were informed by the results of the 2009 study. Those changes include:

An improved PACER Case Locator, with expanded search capabilities
A redesigned www.pacer.gov website
Expanded training, including a partnership with law libraries to train PACER users, a free PACER training database, and online video tutorials
A mobile PACER interface
Streamlined billing for firms and organizations with multiple PACER users, and a redesigned PACER invoice
Expanded availability of free, text-searchable, online public access to court opinions, through the Government Printing Office’s Federal Digital System (FDsys)
Automatic case alerts, through expanded RSS feeds
Audio recordings of some court proceedings

Results indicate that search capabilities remain important to PACER users. Of those surveyed in 2012, 87 percent had used the PACER Case Locator, a tool that allows users to search for information across courts, at least once, compared with 51 percent in 2009. Satisfaction rose in all areas related to searching: 86 percent were pleased with their ability to find cases; 85 were satisfied with the search results, and 79 percent were satisfied with their ability to search for cases across courts. All of those numbers were six to eight percentage points higher than in 2009.

“PACER is user friendly,” one survey taker wrote. “Easy retrieval of documents with no wait time. The most up-to-date information is available.”

PACER users also reported satisfaction with the value they receive for the money they pay, with 81 percent saying they were satisfied and 13 percent describing themselves as neutral. Only 6 percent of users said they were dissatisfied with the value received. Users also gave a 73 percent satisfaction rating for “understanding how PACER is priced,” with 22 percent describing themselves as neutral.

As one user wrote: “Our office utilizes PACER regularly and is very satisfied with the ease of use, availability of documents, and the way PACER charges for documents. Please don’t change it!”

“PACER is a great value for the money,” said Judge Davis, who serves on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit, and is the IT Committee’s liaison to the PACER Working Group. “Unfortunately, nothing is free, but it enables us to provide a lot of service. PACER and CM/ECF really are the gold standard of court information systems.”

 

*Due to rounding, percentages may not add up to 100%.

The survey found that the demographics and usage of PACER were similar to 2009. The two largest user groups were the legal sector (57 percent) and pro se litigants and named parties (15 percent), followed by commercial businesses (9 percent).

Satisfaction improved among all user groups, with the highest ratings from those who use PACER most frequently, and those who know of the PACER Service Center.

More improvements are planned in conjunction with the Next Generation of CM/ECF, slated for release in 2014.

These include a central sign-on, to give dual users, those who access both PACER and CM/ECF, the ability to move seamlessly between the two systems and across multiple courts.  A new user interface also is planned.

“The hope is that it will just continue to get easier to use,” said Judge Davis, who said he is pleased with the transparency PACER has brought to U.S. courts. “As a judge, I want people to know about the courts, and have access to the courts. PACER helps this in a very meaningful way.”