Monthly Archives: October 2012

DOE-supported researcher takes 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

Brian Kobilka

Research performed at Argonne National Laboratory supported the 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for Brian K. Kobilka. Intense X-rays produced by Argonne’s Advanced Photon Source helped enable the first discovery of an important class of chemical receptors that allow cells to receive signals from their environment (see Office of Science feature.) Research at Department of Energy Laboratories has been recognized with 4 Chemistry and 3 Physics Nobel Prizes in the past decade (see DOE news release). Kobilka, Professor of Medicine and Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology at Stanford University School of Medicine, shared the prize with Robert J. Lefkowitz, Professor of Biochemistry at Duke University Medical Center. Read more about Kobilka at the OSTI DOE R&D Accomplishments website and find a roster of Nobel Laureates associated with DOE. DOE R&D Accomplishments is a central forum for information about significant outcomes of past DOE R&D widely recognized as remarkable advancements in science.

S-Adenosyl-L-Methionine (SAMe): An Introduction

S-Adenosyl-L-methionine (also called S-adenosyl methionine, S-adenosylmethionine, SAMe, or SAM-e in the United States or ademetionine in Europe, and also often abbreviated as SAM and AdoMet) is a chemical that is found naturally in the body. SAMe is sold in the United States as a dietary supplement. This fact sheet provides basic information about SAMe, summarizes scientific research on safety and effectiveness, and suggests sources for additional information.

St. John’s Wort and Depression

Depression affects 1 in 10 adults in this country. It’s a serious illness that interferes with daily life and causes pain for both the person with the illness as well as their loved ones. We know that many people with depression never seek help, but the majority, even those with severe disease can benefit with conventional treatment.

5 Things To Know About St. John’s Wort and Depression

St. John’s wort, a plant that grows in the wild, has been used for centuries for mental health conditions and is widely prescribed for depression in Europe. However, current evidence for using St. John’s wort for depression is not conclusive, and the herb can have serious side effects. It is also important to note that in the United States, while there may be public interest in St. John’s wort to treat depression, the Food and Drug Administration has not approved its use as an over-the-counter or prescription medicine for depression.

Clinical Digest: St. John’s Wort and Depression

St. John’s wort, a plant that grows in the wild, has been used for centuries for mental health conditions and is widely prescribed for depression in Europe. There is public interest in the United States as well, and many people come to NCCAM’s Web site seeking information on St. John’s wort for depression, consistently making it one of the top five search terms every month. However, current evidence for using St. John’s wort for depression is not conclusive, and the herb can have serious side effects. It is also important to note that in the United States, the Food and Drug Administration has not approved its use as an over-the-counter or prescription medicine for depression.

This issue provides information on what the science says about St. John’s wort for depression, including scientific evidence, side effects and cautions, and tips for talking with your patients.

Science.gov, Now with Multimedia, New Search Features

Spanish Version Debuted

Science.gov Your Gateway to U.S. Federal Science
Science.gov now includes multimedia content, an updated interface with enhanced navigation, and a Spanish version of the site, Ciencia.Science.gov.

For the first time, R&D video from the DOE ScienceCinema is available as well as from MedlinePLUS, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the National Science Foundation (NSF). Images from the Library of Congress have been added to the image search which is now integrated under a new multimedia tab on the results page. Search enhancements include visual representations of topical information in an easy-to-use touch and dial format (for more information, see the OSTI Announcement).”

Since we first launched Science.gov in 2002, we have continually improved it to make it even more useful to citizens interested in finding research and development results from across the U.S. government,” said OSTI Director Walter Warnick. “Now Science.gov contains multimedia content and is accessible to the Spanish-speaking public. We are pleased with these developments and we fully intend to continue enhancing the value and utility of Science.gov.” OSTI, within the DOE Office of Science, was instrumental in developing Science.gov and hosts the web portal.

The Science.gov Alliance will highlight these and other achievements in its 10th Anniversary celebration in December (more information).

Chairman Rocco Landesman Releases the Schedule for His October 10, 2012 Visit to Newark & Rahway, New Jersey

NEA Chairman Rocco Landesman will visit Newark and Rahway, New Jersey, on October 10 as part of his Art Works tour. His visit is hosted by the NJ Performing Arts Center (NJPAC), the Union County Performing Arts Center (UCPAC), and the New Jersey State Council on the Arts. The evening of the 10th, Landesman will speak at a Harlem School of the Arts event in honor of Herb Alpert at Lincoln Center’s Stanley H. Kaplan Penthouse in New York.