Monthly Archives: June 2011

Virtual library of Energy-related research info revamped and ready for searchers

EnergyFiles has been revamped and now searches over 50 databases of science information in fields relevant to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Topics include biology and medicine, fission and nuclear technologies, geophysics, materials science, mathematics, renewable energy, and more. You can search EnergyFiles with a single query at the homepage, or utilize the advanced search for more customized results. You can also browse useful links related to each subject, including links to relevant organizations, conference information, and reference materials. Over 25% of the resources point to DOE-funded research information. EnergyFiles was the first known federal government federated search engine and was listed in 2005 as a top search portal by the Association of College and Research Libraries.

Improvements include:

  • A one-stop search of all EnergyFiles resources
  • Ranking of results based on relevance
  • Clustering of results by subtopics, authors, and dates
  • Sorting options by rank, date, title, author, and limiting by source
  • Daily, weekly, or monthly alerts of new information in your areas of interest
  • Eureka News results related to your search terms
  • Mark & send option for emailing results to friends and colleagues
  • Download capabilities

WorldWideScience.org Enhancements: Addition of Arabic Translation, Mobile Capability, and Multimedia Results

Arabic has been added to the suite of translated languages at WorldWideScience.org, bringing the total number of translated languages to 10. At WorldWideScience.org, your query can be translated into the languages of the search engine’s 80-plus databases and the results can be translated into  your preferred language. In addition, WorldWideScience.org has added a new multimedia search capability, including search of speech-indexed scientific videos from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and CERN.  Speech-indexing is provided by the Microsoft Research Audio Video Indexing System (MAVIS). Also, a mobile version of WorldWideScience.org (http://m.worldwidescience.org)  has been launched, which will mark another first in the field of federated search. These enhancements build on WorldWideScience.org’s history of innovation in combining information and search technologies with a commitment to accelerate scientific discovery. This commitment is shared by the multilateral WorldWideScience Alliance, comprised of globally-dispersed national and international scientific and technical information organizations.

New mashup offers every-word-searchable multimedia within scientific federated search engines

OSTI now offers a “mashup” of a unique speech-recognition search capability within federated search tools to help citizens and researchers alike find scientific multimedia worldwide. This application appears in ScienceAccelerator.gov and WorldWideScience.org, thereby extending the reach of federated searching that historically had been limited to textual information. Now enhanced multimedia files within these products will be searchable by every spoken word (see press release).

Polytechnic Institute of New York University in the Spotlight at .EDUconnections

Polytechnic Institute of New York University, where Energy Secretary Steven Chu offered remarks for the 2011 graduating class, is in the Spotlight at the OSTI .EDUconnections website. .EDUconnections features U.S. community colleges and universities committed to supporting and advancing DOE scientific research programs. For more institutions in the .EDUconnections spotlight, visit the archive page.

ST06-005: Dealing with Cyberbullies

Original release date: June 01, 2011 | Last revised: February 06, 2013

Bullies are taking advantage of technology to intimidate and harass their victims. Dealing with cyberbullying can be difficult, but there are steps you can take.

What is cyberbullying?

Cyberbullying refers to practice of using technology to harass, or bully, someone else. Bullies used to be restricted to methods such as physical intimidation, postal mail, or the telephone. Now, developments in electronic media offer forums such as email, instant messaging, web pages, and digital photos to add to the arsenal. Computers, cell phones, and PDAs are current tools that are being used to conduct an old practice.

Forms of cyberbullying can range in severity from cruel or embarrassing rumors to threats, harassment, or stalking. It can affect any age group; however, teenagers and young adults are common victims, and cyberbullying is a growing problem in schools.

Why has cyberbullying become such a problem?

The relative anonymity of the internet is appealing for bullies because it enhances the intimidation and makes tracing the activity more difficult. Some bullies also find it easier to be more vicious because there is no personal contact. Unfortunately, the internet and email can also increase the visibility of the activity. Information or pictures posted online or forwarded in mass emails can reach a larger audience faster than more traditional methods, causing more damage to the victims. And because of the amount of personal information available online, bullies may be able to arbitrarily choose their victims.

Cyberbullying may also indicate a tendency toward more serious behavior. While bullying has always been an unfortunate reality, most bullies grow out of it. Cyberbullying has not existed long enough to have solid research, but there is evidence that it may be an early warning for more violent behavior.

How can you protect yourself or your children?

  • Teach your children good online habits – Explain the risks of technology, and teach children how to be responsible online (see Keeping Children Safe Online for more information). Reduce their risk of becoming cyberbullies by setting guidelines for and monitoring their use of the internet and other electronic media (cell phones, PDAs, etc.).
  • Keep lines of communication open – Regularly talk to your children about their online activities so that they feel comfortable telling you if they are being victimized.
  • Watch for warning signs – If you notice changes in your child’s behavior, try to identify the cause as soon as possible. If cyberbullying is involved, acting early can limit the damage.
  • Limit availability of personal information – Limiting the number of people who have access to contact information or details about interests, habits, or employment reduces exposure to bullies that you or your child do not know. This may limit the risk of becoming a victim and may make it easier to identify the bully if you or your child are victimized.
  • Avoid escalating the situation – Responding with hostility is likely to provoke a bully and escalate the situation. Depending on the circumstances, consider ignoring the issue. Often, bullies thrive on the reaction of their victims. Other options include subtle actions. For example, you may be able to block the messages on social networking sites or stop unwanted emails by changing the email address. If you continue to get messages at the new email address, you may have a stronger case for legal action.
  • Document the activity – Keep a record of any online activity (emails, web pages, instant messages, etc.), including relevant dates and times. In addition to archiving an electronic version, consider printing a copy.
  • Report cyberbullying to the appropriate authorities – If you or your child are being harassed or threatened, report the activity. Many schools have instituted bullying programs, so school officials may have established policies for dealing with activity that involves students. If necessary, contact your local law enforcement. Law enforcement agencies have different policies, but your local police department or FBI branch are good starting points. Unfortunately, there is a distinction between free speech and punishable offenses, but the legal implications should be decided by the law enforcement officials and the prosecutors.

Additional information

The following organizations offer additional information about this topic:


Author: Mindi McDowell


This product is provided subject to this Notification and this Privacy & Use policy.

ST06-005: Dealing with Cyberbullies

Original release date: June 01, 2011 | Last revised: February 06, 2013

Bullies are taking advantage of technology to intimidate and harass their victims. Dealing with cyberbullying can be difficult, but there are steps you can take.

What is cyberbullying?

Cyberbullying refers to practice of using technology to harass, or bully, someone else. Bullies used to be restricted to methods such as physical intimidation, postal mail, or the telephone. Now, developments in electronic media offer forums such as email, instant messaging, web pages, and digital photos to add to the arsenal. Computers, cell phones, and PDAs are current tools that are being used to conduct an old practice.

Forms of cyberbullying can range in severity from cruel or embarrassing rumors to threats, harassment, or stalking. It can affect any age group; however, teenagers and young adults are common victims, and cyberbullying is a growing problem in schools.

Why has cyberbullying become such a problem?

The relative anonymity of the internet is appealing for bullies because it enhances the intimidation and makes tracing the activity more difficult. Some bullies also find it easier to be more vicious because there is no personal contact. Unfortunately, the internet and email can also increase the visibility of the activity. Information or pictures posted online or forwarded in mass emails can reach a larger audience faster than more traditional methods, causing more damage to the victims. And because of the amount of personal information available online, bullies may be able to arbitrarily choose their victims.

Cyberbullying may also indicate a tendency toward more serious behavior. While bullying has always been an unfortunate reality, most bullies grow out of it. Cyberbullying has not existed long enough to have solid research, but there is evidence that it may be an early warning for more violent behavior.

How can you protect yourself or your children?

  • Teach your children good online habits – Explain the risks of technology, and teach children how to be responsible online (see Keeping Children Safe Online for more information). Reduce their risk of becoming cyberbullies by setting guidelines for and monitoring their use of the internet and other electronic media (cell phones, PDAs, etc.).
  • Keep lines of communication open – Regularly talk to your children about their online activities so that they feel comfortable telling you if they are being victimized.
  • Watch for warning signs – If you notice changes in your child’s behavior, try to identify the cause as soon as possible. If cyberbullying is involved, acting early can limit the damage.
  • Limit availability of personal information – Limiting the number of people who have access to contact information or details about interests, habits, or employment reduces exposure to bullies that you or your child do not know. This may limit the risk of becoming a victim and may make it easier to identify the bully if you or your child are victimized.
  • Avoid escalating the situation – Responding with hostility is likely to provoke a bully and escalate the situation. Depending on the circumstances, consider ignoring the issue. Often, bullies thrive on the reaction of their victims. Other options include subtle actions. For example, you may be able to block the messages on social networking sites or stop unwanted emails by changing the email address. If you continue to get messages at the new email address, you may have a stronger case for legal action.
  • Document the activity – Keep a record of any online activity (emails, web pages, instant messages, etc.), including relevant dates and times. In addition to archiving an electronic version, consider printing a copy.
  • Report cyberbullying to the appropriate authorities – If you or your child are being harassed or threatened, report the activity. Many schools have instituted bullying programs, so school officials may have established policies for dealing with activity that involves students. If necessary, contact your local law enforcement. Law enforcement agencies have different policies, but your local police department or FBI branch are good starting points. Unfortunately, there is a distinction between free speech and punishable offenses, but the legal implications should be decided by the law enforcement officials and the prosecutors.

Additional information

The following organizations offer additional information about this topic:


Author: Mindi McDowell


This product is provided subject to this Notification and this Privacy & Use policy.

Thin films, tunneling, and superconductivity research info at DOE R&D Accomplishments website

Ivar Giaever
Ivar Giaever worked in the fields of thin films, tunneling, and superconductivity, which eventually yielded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1973. He collaborated to develop Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing, a technology which studies in real time the activities of cells grown in tissue culture and has many applications today in the biophysical technology market. Find resources with additional information at the OSTI DOE R&D Accomplishments website. DOE R&D Accomplishments is a central forum for information about significant outcomes of past DOE R&D widely recognized as remarkable advancements in science.